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Online Multisensory Lessons
In Reading and Spelling

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Our Approach to Dyslexia Treatment

OUR PROGRAM

Individualized

Tailored to meet the unique learning needs of each individual student.

OUR PROGRAM

Multisensory

Engages all senses: visual, auditory, and tactile for comprehensive learning.

OUR PROGRAM

Multidisciplinary

Combines expertise in education, linguistics, psychology, and healthcare.

How Our Program Works

OUR PROGRAM

Students complete an informal assessment to determine an individualized work plan.

OUR PROGRAM

Focused, online sessions take place weekly via Zoom.

OUR PROGRAM

As students advance, previous lessons are reviewed to ensure long-term information is retained. 

OUR PROGRAM

No stone unturned. Instructors remain on lessons until students have demonstrated proficiency.

Our Approach

Our Approach Orton Gillingham Dyslexia Treatment Offers an adaptation of the Orton-Gillingham approach to deliver highly structured, multisensory, phonics-based lessons.

Program Essentials

Phonics

Learning how to use different letter and sound combinations to decode words is called phonics. In English, there are more sounds than letters: 44 unique sounds and 26 letters. These 44 sounds provide the means by which the developing reader can attach letters to create “visible speech.”  

Predictable – One-to-One Letter Sound Relationships

Here the focus is on specific consonants such as b, d, f, h, j, k, l, m, p, r, t, w, and z, where there is a simple one-to-one relationship between letter and sound. 

Writing Letters

A major turning point in learning to read is recognizing and writing letters. Once children learn to write letters, they can participate in writing exercises that strengthen the awareness of the sounds that make up words and how letters represent these sounds.

Vowel Sounds

Vowels are the backbones of words. Children first learn short vowel sounds and later about how long vowels “say their names.

Complex Letter-Sound Patterns

Once children have mastered one-sound-one-letter relationships, they are ready to learn more complicated patterns, where two, three, or even four letters represent a single speech sound. First, children learn about digraphs (sh- as in shape, ch- as in chat), then about trigraphs (-dge as in judge, -tch as in itch), and finally about quadrigraphs (-eigh as in sleigh, -ough as in rough).

Rules

Children are taught specific rules to help them pronounce different letter patterns. Oftentimes, the pronunciation of a letter depends on which letters come after it. For example, the letter c sounds like a k when it is followed by an a, o, or u (cap, cop, cute), or as ‘ssss’ when followed by i, e, or y (civil, cent, cycle).

Spelling

Spelling and reading go hand in hand. As children learn to read words they will also learn how to spell them because spelling strongly reinforces reading. Like reading, spelling instruction follows a specific sequence that begins with phonemic awareness and then continues with which letters stand for which sounds. Eventually, children learn that the same sound can have different spellings. Through spelling lessons, they learn the most frequent spelling patterns and which spelling strategies to apply to help spell new words. 

Phonemic Awareness

Learning how to use different letter and sound combinations to decode words is called phonics. In English, there are more sounds than letters: 44 unique sounds and 26 letters. These 44 sounds provide the means by which the developing reader can attach letters to create “visible speech.”

Sight Words

There are some words in the English language that cannot be sounded out. These words such as does, where, once, and pretty, are known as sight words. It is important that these words are committed to memory and recognized on sight and at an early age since many of them are in children’s books. 

Taking Apart Bigger Words

Learning how to use different letter and sound combinations to decode words is called phonics. In English, there are more sounds than letters: 44 unique sounds and 26 letters. These 44 sounds provide the means by which the developing reader can attach letters to create “visible speech.”

Reading Fluency

Reading fluency is the hallmark of a skilled reader. Fluency refers to the ability to read a text accurately, quickly, and with proper expression.

Self Confidence

Self-confidence is probably the most important element in ensuring that a budding reader is on a good path. At the Orton Gillingham Dyslexia Treatment, we understand that it is critical that every child achieves some degree of success after every lesson. For this reason, positive comments and encouragement are central to our teaching strategy, and our comprehensive curriculum ensures that all students find success in every lesson.

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Orton Gillingham Dyslexia Treatment
3148 East Locust Ave Orange, CA 92867

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